Tag Archives: Christian Living

Intellectual Humility : Part 2

In our Easter chapel service, we talked about how Jesus Christ is the perfect example of intellectual character and virtue. We have been talking about the following intellectual character traits all semester:

  • Intellectual courage, which helps you to find the truth and live out that truth.
  • Intellectual honesty is how we use the truth we know. It is the link that goes from our thinking to our actions.
  • Intellectual tenacity is the character of being very determined and persistent in seeking truth and knowledge.
  • Intellectual carefulness involves being patient, diligent, and careful in the search for truth and knowledge.
  • Intellectual humility is seen in those who want to know the truth, and therefore constantly recognize that they, like all people, are sinful and capable of error.

As we continue to talk about humility, let’s look at Proverbs 11:2 which says: “When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.” Continue reading

Jesus, the Perfect Example

This semester chapel has been about intellectual character and virtue. We have defined intellectual character as the thought process behind every decision we make. Today we’re going to talk about the greatest example of intellectual character. Not only is He the greatest example of intellectual character, He is also the Savior of the world. Continue reading

Intellectual Humility

In chapel this semester, we have been talking about intellectual character and virtue. Intellectual character involves the thought process behind every decision we make.

We began with intellectual courage, which is the virtue that helps you to find truth and live out that truth. We then discussed intellectual honesty, which demonstrates how we use the truth we know. It is the link that goes from our thinking to our actions. We moved on to intellectual tenacity, which we defined as being very determined and persistent in seeking truth and knowledge. For the last few weeks, we discussed intellectual carefulness, which involves patience, diligence, and carefulness in the search for truth and knowledge.

This week we turn to another virtue, intellectual humility. People who have intellectual humility want to know the truth, so they constantly recognize that they, like all people, are sinful and capable of error. They are humble because they are aware that truth is none of their making, but is God-breathed. Continue reading

Intellectual Carefulness

This semester we are talking about intellectual character and virtues. Intellectual character involves the thought processes behind every decision we make.  We have already spoken about courage, which helps you to search for and live out a life of truth.  We then discussed honesty as a characteristic of how to use the truth we know. Honesty is the link that goes from our thinking to our actions.  We used Abraham Lincoln’s honesty as an example.  And recently, we explored intellectual tenacity—or persistence—in seeking truth and knowledge.

This week we move our series into intellectual carefulness.  Intellectual carefulness is the understanding of being patient, diligent, and careful in the search for truth and knowledge. Basically, as a student, this trait is defined as being careful in your work, making sure you understand what is being taught, and taking the time to do your best!

Continue reading

Intellectual Tenacity

This semester we have been discussing intellectual character and its virtues. We have defined intellectual character as the thought process behind every decision we make.  We began the semester talking about the intellectual courage to find and live out truth, and continued discussing honesty which comes from knowing the truth. This week we will be talking about intellectual tenacity.  Continue reading

Intellectual Honesty : Part 3

This semester we have been talking about intellectual character and its virtues. Intellectual character involves the thought process behind every decision we make. We began with talking about intellectual courage. Intellectual courage helps you to find the truth and live out that truth. This week we continue our look at intellectual virtues and intellectual honesty. Continue reading

Intellectual Honesty : Part 2

This semester we are discussing intellectual character and its virtues. Intellectual character is the thought process behind every decision we make. We started with talking about courage. Intellectual courage helps you to find the truth and live out that truth. This week we continue our look at intellectual virtues with intellectual honesty.

Continue reading

Intellectual Courage: The Courage of Daniel

This semester we want to talk about intellectual character and its virtues. To have intellectual character is to care about learning and knowledge and to have a desire to find truth. Before you can act like a good person, you have to think like a good person. Intellectual character is the finding of the true way to live and act by first thinking of the true way to live and act.

For example, if there is candy that is not yours on a table and you want to take it, but you don’t, there had to be a truth in you of why you shouldn’t steal that candy. Or perhaps, maybe you see someone making fun of someone else, but you don’t make fun of them and instead stand up for them. You first had a truth of loving your neighbor in your thoughts that lead to your act. That is intellectual character–knowing what is right and what is wrong in your thoughts, that leads to you acting it out. In order to have intellectual character, you must work on different intellectual virtues.

The first virtue we will discuss is intellectual courage. Over the next three weeks we will discuss intellectual courage. But the first thing we need to understand about intellectual courage is that it is different than courageous acts. Courage is the act of being brave. We will talk about it in the next few weeks, but today I want to explain intellectual courage. Intellectual courage helps you find the truth and live out the truth. Let’s read Daniel 1:1-4:

In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and besieged it. And the Lord delivered Jehoiakim king of Judah into his hand, along with some of the articles from the temple of God. These he carried off to the temple of his god in Babylonia and put in the treasure house of his god. Then the king ordered Ashpenaz, chief of his court officials, to bring into the king’s service some of the Israelites from the royal family and the nobility—young men without any physical defect, handsome, showing aptitude for every kind of learning, well informed, quick to understand, and qualified to serve in the king’s palace. He was to teach them the language and literature of the Babylonians.

So let’s talk about Daniel. He was a noble young Israelite man who was smart, who studied, and who was qualified to work with the King of Judah, but he was taken to work with the king of Judah’s enemy. However, throughout his studies while he was young and went to school, he used his intellectual courage to find the truth that God was the only true God and that Daniel would be taken care of by God.

What I really want us to see is that he knew beyond everything the truth of God.

He was not going to change by learning about another country or language.  He was going to a new country with new laws, and a new language and new leaders, but God stayed the same. Daniel had the mindset to be brave and courageous even before he went before the king, was told to not pray to God, and was ultimately thrown into a lion’s den. He had been trained in the virtue of intellectual courage and that kept him alive and blessed in a nation that was not his own.

Today you will take tests and read and write. You will study and work math problems.  You will be taught by your teachers and parents. What we should all do is look for the truth that is out there that helps us live the life God wants us to live–the truth of life, salvation, love and grace in Jesus. That truth will give us the courage to seek God more, desire to learn more, the bravery to stand up for others, and for the truth.

No matter where we grow up and where we live, God is still the same truth!  And it is the everyday decisions that build up our intellectual courage. So today, seek and stand up for what is good and true and beautiful and in doing so you will start to gain courage!