The Games We Play

The sermon uses the metaphor of games for resource allocation and human cooperation to help understand the story of the creation of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil in Genesis 2.  Students were challenged to ask themselves about the goals of the various games they play in life (family, school, religious, etc) and whether or not the strategies they employ will lead them to desirable outcomes.  The standard is God’s claim that the world is a better place with humanity than without it (Genesis 1:26-31). Are you handling your life in a way that allows you to assess it the way God originally assessed man’s presence in his creation?

Think about the payoff of the strategy you’re using to play the game at Annapolis. Is it a strategy that helps you to gain the payoff that the school itself offers? Similarly, spend time considering whether or not you handle your life in a way that leads to the payoff you want. And spend time considering whether or not you have been handling your life in a way that matches the standard set by God. In Genesis 1, God says than humanity in the world is ‘very good.’ Are you playing in a way that you could imagine God (or even yourself in a realistic mood) calling your strategy ‘very good?’